Saturday, June 7, 2008

Tuskegee Airmen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tuskegee Airmen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Color poster of a Tuskegee Airman
Color poster of a Tuskegee Airman

Prior to the Tuskegee Airmen, no U.S. military pilots had been black. A series of legislative moves by the United States Congress in 1941 forced the Army Air Corps to form an all-black combat unit, despite the War Department's reluctance. In an effort to eliminate the unit before it could begin, the War Department set up a system to accept only those with a level of flight experience or higher education that they expected would be hard to fill. This policy backfired when the Air Corps received an abundance of applications from men who qualified even under these restrictive specifications.

The U.S. Army Air Corps had established the Psychological Research Unit 1 at Maxwell Army Air Field, Alabama, and other units around the country for aviation cadet training, which included the identification, selection, education, and training of pilots, navigators and bombardiers. Psychologists employed in these research studies and training programs used some of the first standardized tests to quantify IQ, dexterity, and leadership qualities in order to select and train the right personnel for the right role (bombardier, pilot, navigator). The Air Corps determined that the same existing programs would be used for all units, including all-black units. At Tuskegee, this effort would continue with the selection and training of the Tuskegee Airmen.


The 332nd Fighter Group attends a briefing in Italy in 1945.
The 332nd Fighter Group attends a briefing in Italy in 1945.

Tuskegee Airmen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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