Wednesday, June 18, 2008

The de Havilland Mosquito and Operation Jericho

de Havilland Mosquito - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The de Havilland Mosquito was a British combat aircraft that excelled in a number of roles during the Second World War. Originally conceived as an unarmed fast bomber, uses of the Mosquito included: low to medium altitude daytime tactical bomber, high altitude night bomber, pathfinder, day or night fighter, fighter-bomber, intruder, maritime strike and photo reconnaissance aircraft. It was also used as the basis for a single-seat heavy fighter, the de Havilland Hornet. It served with the Royal Air Force (RAF) and many other air forces both in the Second World War and postwar (see Operators below). The Mosquito was known affectionately as the "Mossie" to its crews[1] and was also known as "The Wooden Wonder" or "The Timber Terror" as the bulk of the aircraft was made of laminated plywood.[2]

de Havilland Mosquito - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Operation Jericho - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Operation Jericho was a low-level World War II bombing raid by Allied aircraft on Amiens Prison in German-occupied France on 18 February 1944. The object of the raid was to free French Resistance and political prisoners, 120 of whom were to be executed the following day.

Mosquito bombers succeeded in breaching the walls and buildings of the prison, as well as destroying guards' barracks. Of the 717 prisoners, 102 were killed, 74 wounded, and 258 escaped, including 79 Resistance and political prisoners, although two thirds were recaptured.[1] One of the inmates was also privy to sensitive information concerning Operation Overlord.

Operation Jericho - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia





Special Thanks to New Babbage citizen and RCAF pilot Bela Lubezki
for the Wikipedia link to this classic warbird.
Post a Comment